Obama

Malia Obama, 19, was caught on camera dancing up a storm on Friday night during The Killers set at the Lollapalooza music festival in Chicago. She rolled around on the grass at one point and banged her head to the music. Malia reportedly spent most of the set backstage with friends before going to dance. Social media was quick to defend the teenager for enjoying herself with friends on a night out. Last year the former first daughter made headlines for twerking and allegedly smoking a joint at the popular festival. Malia was seemingly letting off some steam as she winds down from her summer internship with producer Harvey Weinstein in New York. She is set to start classes at Harvard in a few weeks.

Republican senators voted Tuesday to more forward on their seven-year pledge to repeal portions of Obamacare, with Vice President Mike Pence issuing the tie-breaking vote to unlock hours of debate to assemble details of a final healthcare bill.

The procedural motion was advanced along party lines by a 50-50 vote, with Pence breaking the tie. All 48 Democrats and two Republicans, Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, voted no.

The vote was held open while senators waited for Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who was recently diagnosed with brain cancer, to arrive on the Senate floor.

The vote begins as much as 20 hours of debate on the House-passed healthcare bill, the American Health Care Act, and a new bill will be swapped in its place. A vote in favor of beginning debate does not necessarily indicate that a senator will support a final repeal bill.

Republicans are expected to debate repealing portions of Obamacare, including its taxes, and the individual mandate that requires people to buy insurance or pay a fine. The party has been hammering out details for several months, trying to bring various factions of the party together regarding changes to Medicaid and whether the Senate bill would adequately result in lower premiums. Centrists are concerned about the impact that repealing Obamacare would have on the law’s Medicaid expansion and on people with pre-existing conditions, while conservatives say that the Senate bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, doesn’t do enough to repeal Obamacare and bring down premiums.

The Congressional Budget Office estimated that 23 million more people would be uninsured by 2026 under the House-passed bill.

Before the vote began, about 20 protesters shouted “kill the bill” and, “Shame! Shame! Shame!” from the public viewing gallery after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., implored fellow Republicans to vote in favor of starting debate. They were escorted out before the vote began.

“We can’t let this moment slip by,” McConnell said in a floor speech ahead of the vote. “We’ve talked about this too long. We’ve wrestled with the issues, we’ve watched the consequences of the status quo. The people who sent us here expect us to begin this debate, to have the courage to tackle a tough issue.”