Police News

Video showing a veteran Rhode Island state trooper using force against a suspect in a holding cell has been released from a federal court seal. The video was taken in 2014 and shows Trooper Jamie Donnelly-Taylor walking suspect Lionel Monsanto into a cell at the Lincoln state police barracks. Donnelly-Taylor is then seen throwing several punches at Monsanto, who falls to the floor.

The tape has been part of an ongoing legal battle between the trooper, state police, and the attorney general’s office. Donnelly-Taylor pleaded no contest to simple assault, but said he did so because then-Col. Steven O’Donnell assured him the plea would prevent the video from becoming public and the state would represent him in any lawsuit, according to a statement from his attorney. Then-Attorney General Peter Kilmartin eventually decided not to represent the trooper. The state reached a $125,000 settlement with Monsanto last year.

Donnelly-Taylor’s attorney argued that Monsanto first struck the trooper with his elbow, before Donnelly-Taylor used force.

“This case was truly a miscarriage of justice. A video showing an officer’s use of force is never pretty. However, viewing the video in slow motion in this case clearly shows that the officer was assaulted by the suspect prior to using force,” said attorney John Martin.

Donnelly-Taylor is a 17-year veteran of the state police. He is currently on injured on duty status.

A person with ties to the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office shared some disturbing videos that show an inmate being attacked while in custody.

The video shows an inmate at the Shelby County Detention Center being pepper- sprayed then kicked by several officers with the county’s Detention Response Team.

As the video continues, the same kicking officer can be seen exchanging words with the inmate. Jailers the step in to separate the two.

The sheriff’s office responded by saying in part, “Once he attacked the deputy, the team immediately tried to gain control of the combative inmate, who positioned himself in a fighting stance, presumably to attack additional deputies.”

Video released Monday shows the moments before, during and after two Bell County corrections officers beat a man after moving him in handcuffs to a padded cell because he had “become paranoid and unruly.”

Jvareus Aquer Pratt, 23, of Temple has been jailed since Feb. 27 in lieu of $200,000 bond, on charges stemming from an incident in which one of his girlfriend’s children was hit with a charger and another was burned with a curling iron.

Bell County corrections officers Kelvin Miller, 34, and Terrance Gardner, 28, were arrested on March 18 and charged with assault/bodily injury and violation of the civil rights of a person in custody following a Texas Rangers investigation of the incident, which occurred on March 14.

Both were released after posting $5,000 bonds.

Pratt was named in indictments back in March charging assault of a family or household member with previous convictions and injury to a child.

In the video, the corrections officers responded to his cell at around 3:42 a.m. on March 14 after Pratt “relayed to the deputies that he did ingest methamphetamine and (had) become paranoid and unruly,” the affidavits say.

Mexico has deployed almost 15,000 soldiers and members of its National Guard in the north of the country to stem the flow of illegal immigration across the border into the United States. Mexico has not traditionally used security forces to stop undocumented foreign citizens leaving the country for the U.S., and photographs of militarized police catching Central American and Cuban women at the border in recent days have met with criticism. Mexico is trying to curb a surge of migrants from third countries crossing its territory in order to reach the United States, under the threat of tariffs on its exports by U.S. President Donald Trump, who has made tightening border security a priority

An Albuquerque woman was filmed yelling obscenities at a police officer after she was arrested for allegedly riding her electric scooter in the wrong direction while intoxicated.

Lily Romero, 27, was the first resident of the New Mexico city who was arrested for DWI on an electric scooter – just days after the vehicles were legally allowed onto the town’s roadways.

Albuquerque rolled out its rent-a-scooter program operated by the Boston-based company Zagster.

Local laws require e-scooter riders to stay in bike lanes. Wherever there aren’t bike lanes, e-scooters must be ridden on sidewalks.

After being stopped, Romero told police that she was returning from a bar, where she drank two beers, KOB-TV reported.

In the police complaint, officers allege that they could smell alcohol on her breath.

In the video, the officer is seen trying to explain to Romero why she is being pulled over despite her not driving a car.

‘If I fail this I’m going to get a DWI? Is that what you’re saying?’

The officer replies that there will be an investigation and that her being charged is a possibility.

Tulsa police released dramatic body camera video of a suspect falling off of a bridge while trying to escape police.

Officers were called about someone pointing a deadly weapon and shooting with intent to kill near 31st and Sheridan the morning of April 30. Police found the suspect near I-244 and Sheridan when they began to follow his vehicle and attempted to pull him over, police say.

Damico Taylor, 23, of Sand Springs, accelerated hard westbound on I-244 from Delaware Avenue. A short chase began but ended less than a minute later when Taylor’s vehicle hit a barrier wall on the north leg of the Inner Dispersal Loop, police say.

Taylor exited the vehicle and tried to escape by crossing the barrier wall of the elevated roadway. He fell more than 30 feet to the ground below.

He was taken to the hospital where he was admitted in stable condition.

A .40 cal Glock 23C semi-auto pistol, chamber loaded, was recovered from the vehicle.

Bodycam footage released by a Wisconsin police department shows officers engaged in a gun battle with a man who they had just administered Narcan and it ends with an innocent bystander and the gunman being shot dead.

Officer Paul Christensen and Sgt. Christopher Biese exchanged shots with 47-year-old Ruben Houston of Wausau on May 15 outside of Appleton’s downtown transit center. Christensen was wounded, along with a bystander. Both have been released from the hospital.

Appleton firefighter Mitchell Lundgaard, 36, was shot and died of his injuries at a hospital.

Footage shows the moment when Houston opened fire on the responding officers. He pulls out a gun and opens fire before the officer runs off and gets in a position to return fire.

Houston was shot several times and later died at a hospital. He had been out on bond for drug charges.

OHIO: Cuyahoga County officials have released surveillance video that shows now-indicted corrections officers spraying pepper foam on an inmate while she is restrained in a chair.

Clark is accused of using pepper foam on the female in July 2018, while guard Robert Marsh is charged with unlawfully restraining her. Marsh also allegedly struck the inmate.

The incident was caught on the two angles of jail’s surveillance cameras.

The men are two of five corrections officers who were indicted following a lengthy investigation by the Ohio Attorney General’s Office.

A prosecutor has announced felony charges against an Atlanta-area police officer who was captured on video hitting a homeless woman inside a convenience store.

Cellphone video forced prosecutors to reconsider the use-of-force case involving DeKalb County officer Phillip Larscheid from two years ago.

The officer was called to a Decatur gas station for a shoplifting and loitering call involving Katie McCrary but when she tried to leave and push past the officer, he beat her with his baton.

The GBI then turned over its findings to the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office.

“We determined that the case warranted proprietorial action and presented the case today to the grand jury for one count of aggravated assault and one count of violation of oath of office, both felony charges,” said DeKalb County district attorney Sherry Boston.

McCrary was arrested and taken to jail but her injuries looked so severe the jail wouldn’t take her, and sent her to the hospital instead.

The charges against McCrary have been dropped.

OBSCENITY ARREST SPARKS 1ST AMENDMENT CLAIM

REPORT FROM LAKE CITY REPORTER

A Florida man is claiming his First Amendment rights were violated after he was arrested Sunday for sporting an “I Eat Ass” sticker on his truck, which is apparently a violation of the state’s obscenity law.

According to the Lake City Reporter, 23-year-old Dillon Shane Webb was pulled over on Highway 90 after an officer with the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office spotted his “I Eat Ass” sticker on the back of his Chevrolet truck.

A former Ormond Beach police officer was arrested after Flagler County deputies said he was involved in a crash while allegedly driving drunk Sunday afternoon, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

Brenton Hodge, 55, is facing charges of driving under the influence and possession of marijuana, jail records show.

According to FCSO, deputies responded to the crash on U.S. 1 at Seminole Woods Boulevard. Hodge was sitting in the driver’s seat of a blue Nissan with severe damage to the rear, deputies said.

Deputies said they could smell alcohol on his breath, that his eyes were bloodshot and there were several beer cans scattered on the floor of his car.

Deputies said when they questioned Hodge, he flashed his wallet and badge and told deputies he was a retired Ormond Beach police officer.

After paramedics arrived, deputies said they saw Hodge try to conceal a clear plastic bag down the front of his blue jeans, which contained several smaller bags of marijuana.

“As a former law enforcement officer, he should be well aware of the dangers of drinking and driving,” Sheriff Rick Staly said in a statement.

The driver of the other car involved in the crash was taken to the hospital, deputies said.

Hodge is being held at the Flagler County Jail in lieu of $3,500 bail.

Washington, DC Attorney General Karl Racine says his office is reviewing the district’s policies on how police interact with juveniles after a video surfaced this week of a police officer forcibly handcuffing a 9-year-old boy. The video, which aired on WTTG, shows an officer chasing after a small boy who was leaning against a car and apparently talked back to the officer. Racine called the video “obviously concerning.” It depicts the boy “being horse-collared by the officer,” DC Councilman Charles Allen told CNN. He said the video would cause “distrust and damage,” for the whole community’s relationship with law enforcement. A spokeswoman for DC’s Metropolitan Police Department confirmed to CNN that “MPD officers were in the vicinity during their normal patrol, making contact with residents when the incident occurred. The nine year-old boy was not charged with any crimes. As with all use of force incidents, this is currently under internal investigation.”

Broward Public Defender’s Office is accusing a deputy of using excessive force on a handcuffed suspect.

Broward Sheriff’s Office units were called to a domestic disturbance at a Pompano Beach Walmart back in Jan. 1.

Deputy Jorge Sobrino investigated and subsequently arrested David O’Connell for resisting without violence.

Before being taken to jail, O’Connell was transported to North Broward Medical Center to be evaluated.

That’s where things took a violent turn.

In an arrest report, Sobrino claimed that O’Connell pushed him first, and in turn, he felt forced to strike.

The video, however, appears to show differently.

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Authorities in Florida were getting ready to crack down on speeding drivers last week when they discovered they couldn’t catch any because someone tipped off drivers.

The Collier County Sheriff’s Office said in a Facebook post that officers were initially set up to conduct a speed enforcement operation in the Golden State Estates neighborhood after requests from residents.

“After a significant amount of time had passed they were puzzled,” police said Wednesday. “Traffic was steady, so why had they identified just one driver who was traveling over the speed limit?”

An Oregon woman called 911 to report a stranger was in her bathroom & had locked the door locked. With guns drawn, officers found only a Roomba and a very clean floor.

Body camera footage has emerged showing heavily armed police and a K-9 storming into an Oregon home looking for a suspected intruder that turned out to be just a Roomba.

Roombas almost never get convicted, they always clean up the crime scene.

A new surveillance video shows Chicago police officers push and drag a student down a set of stairs in February at Marshall High School on the West Side before punching her and shocking her with a stun gun multiple times.

The video, obtained by the Chicago Sun-Times, appears to contradict the officers’ statements that the student initiated the violent encounter after the incident to justify their use of force — again raising questions of the oversight, training and stationing of police officers in Chicago Public Schools.

A former Mississippi Gulf Coast police officer has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for the death of her three-year-old daughter, who was left in a patrol car while her mother had sex with a supervisor.

Cassie Barker, 29, received the maximum sentence for manslaughter on Monday in Harrison County court after having pleaded guilty last month in the September 2016 death of her daughter Cheyenne Hyer.

Barker admitted to leaving Cheyenne strapped in a car seat in her patrol car for four hours while the mother was with her then-supervisor, Sgt Clark Ladner, at his home in Kiln after wrapping up a 12-hour shift just before 9am.

The car’s air conditioning was turned on, but it wasn’t blowing cold air. Outside the car, temperatures reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit that day.